“We need your support to protect our precious  native birds, and their habitats, from predators

for future generations.”


Click here to make a donation.

Moa Conservation Trust

Moa Conservation Trust was formed in 2014 by a group of friends who recognize and appreciate the value of New Zealand’s natural environment and the risk its indigenous birdlife and flora is exposed to as a consequence of introduced predators. New Zealand is renowned worldwide for its clean, green, natural environment and its natural heritage is in danger. Moa Conservation Trust is contributing to the conservation efforts of the Department of Conservation, and other groups throughout New Zealand, to ensure the preservation of its native birdlife, one possum at a time.


New Zealand has lost more bird species than any other nation and has the highest percentage at risk of those remaining than any other nation. It has lost 42 percent of its terrestrial birds since human settlement 700 years ago. The 57 extinct birds evolved in an isolated land, without mammal predators; they developed various levels of flightlessness, ground feeding and nesting habits, and fearlessness over millions of years. The first 38 extinctions during human settlement were influenced by Maori hunting for food, indiscriminate forest burning, and the introduction of the Polynesian rat and dogs.

“Introduced to New Zealand in 1837 to establish a fur trade, the possum has become one of the greatest threats to our natural environment.”

Department of Conservation, Te Papa Atawhai

Since European settlement in New Zealand in the mid-19th Century there have been another 19 losses caused by logging, forest clearing for pasture combined with the introduction of a hoard of predatory animals including the principal bird enemies - stoats, rats and possums. Additionally, a further 50 species are classified as ‘nationally critical’ or ‘nationally endangered’.

Keep up to date with the latest information, news and views on our Facebook page.
You don't have to be on Facebook just click this button and take a look.

© 2015  Moa Conservation Trust  ALL rights reserved